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Vernacularisation in architecture : lived cultural ideas, meanings and implications

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dc.contributor.author Schneider-John, Christina
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-20T19:26:33Z
dc.date.accessioned 2022-10-31T22:39:25Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-20T19:26:33Z
dc.date.available 2022-10-31T22:39:25Z
dc.date.copyright 2004
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.wgtn.ac.nz/handle/123456789/27235
dc.description.abstract This thesis is about vernacular architecture within a cultural context. Although it has been widely acknowledged that the study of vernacular architecture has been neglected (Oliver, 1969, Rapoport, 1969, Rudolfskv, 1964), this thesis argues that it is the confusing way the concept 'vernacular' is applied in the literature that poses the real problem. Furthermore, the vast majority of scholars have not dealt with the subject in a critical and analytical manner. This thesis attempts to bring some clarity to this issue initially by investigating how the term 'Vernacular' is used by prominent scholars and professionals. A conceptual framework is then developed and tested by a case study of the vernacular architectures of Kerala, India. The term vernacular can mean various things to different people. It is a term that has evolved, meaning one thing for example in seventeenth century Europe and quite another by the nineteenth century, as traditions varied and building technologies evolved. This variation is also reflected in academic circles, where scholars use an array of words to describe vernacular architecture, such as 'primitive', 'tribal', 'traditional', 'indigenous', 'regional', 'anonymous', 'folk' and 'popular'. Oliver states that there is no single approach to the study of vernacular architecture (1997: 1) The process of 'Sanskritisation' has enabled lower castes within the society to raise their status in a generation or two. For this normative pattern, S. K. Chatterjee's word, 'Indianism', is perhaps a more acceptable designation than 'Sanskritic Hinduism'. Whether the process of cultural mobility is called 'Sanskritisation' or 'Indianisation', it is compatible with westernisation and modernisation. (Singer, 1972: 268). The process of 'Sanskritisation' ha enabled lower castes within the society to raise their status in a generation or two.For this normative pattern,S.K.Chatterjee's word,'Indianism',is perhaps a more acceptable designation than 'Sankristic Hindusm'.Whether the process of cultural mobility is called 'Sankritisation'or 'Indianisation',it is compatible with westernisation and modernisation.(Singer,1972:268) Since vernacular architecture has essentially not been construed as a separate discipline, it suffers from the lack of a coordinated approach. Conversely, the great diversity of perceptions which various disciplines contribute to the topic is perhaps its greatest advantage. en_NZ
dc.format pdf en_NZ
dc.language en_NZ
dc.language.iso en_NZ
dc.publisher Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
dc.title Vernacularisation in architecture : lived cultural ideas, meanings and implications en_NZ
dc.type Text en_NZ
vuwschema.type.vuw Awarded Research Masters Thesis en_NZ
thesis.degree.discipline Architecture en_NZ
thesis.degree.grantor Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
thesis.degree.level Masters en_NZ


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