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Managing in the middle: a study of the experiences of social workers moving to senior social work positions in the Department of Social Welfare

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dc.contributor.author Quivooy, Maarten
dc.date.accessioned 2011-10-10T22:22:57Z
dc.date.accessioned 2022-10-31T19:23:10Z
dc.date.available 2011-10-10T22:22:57Z
dc.date.available 2022-10-31T19:23:10Z
dc.date.copyright 1987
dc.date.issued 1987
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.wgtn.ac.nz/handle/123456789/26830
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines the transition experiences of social workers moving from direct practice positions to middle-management supervisory positions in the Department of Social Welfare in New Zealand. The study takes the form of a nationwide survey of all the field-work (320.104) senior social workers in the Department of Social Welfare who were promoted to their jobs from direct practice positions during 1985 and 1986. A postal questionnaire was administered to a sample of 56 senior social workers, which sought to obtain information on: what senior social workers see as being important in their jobs, the transition experience of moving from direct practice to senior social work, the factors accounting for problems of transition, the factors preparing senior social workers for their role, and what senior social workers see their training needs as being. The information obtained from the questionnaire was analysed using the S.A.S programme on an IBM computer at Victoria University. Due to the small sample only simple descriptive statistics were used, including some cross-tabulations of variables, which were tested for significance. Findings revealed that the transition from direct practice to senior social work positions can be difficult, and that the greatest degree of difficulty is experienced in assuming and exercising the authority of the senior social work position. Respondents experienced less difficulty in the actual skill aspects of their job than in negotiating the change of role from direct practice. Almost half of the respondents felt unprepared for the position of senior social worker, and all but 2 of the respondents indicated a need for training in their present jobs. These results are assessed in the light of existing information on role transition in social work, a structural analysis of social work management, and socialization processes. In conclusion, issues arising from the research which require further investigation, are identified. en_NZ
dc.format pdf en_NZ
dc.language en_NZ
dc.language.iso en_NZ
dc.publisher Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
dc.title Managing in the middle: a study of the experiences of social workers moving to senior social work positions in the Department of Social Welfare en_NZ
dc.type Text en_NZ
vuwschema.type.vuw Awarded Research Masters Thesis en_NZ
thesis.degree.discipline Social Work en_NZ
thesis.degree.grantor Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
thesis.degree.level Masters en_NZ


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