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A review of some aspects of the development in New Zealand of state educational services for handicapped children with general reference to the primary school service between the years 1945 and 1965

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dc.contributor.author Howse, Mary Rose
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-15T20:21:18Z
dc.date.accessioned 2022-10-25T02:25:39Z
dc.date.available 2011-02-15T20:21:18Z
dc.date.available 2022-10-25T02:25:39Z
dc.date.copyright 1966
dc.date.issued 1966
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.wgtn.ac.nz/handle/123456789/22903
dc.description.abstract Since the Second World War there has been such an expansion of special education and so many changes in the structure of this service, that a need exists for a simple overview of the development of this branch of education. Kirk has defined special education as "...that additional educational service over and above the regular school program, which is provided for an exceptional child to assist in the development of the potentialities and/or in the amelioration of his disabilities." Kirk, S.A. Educating Exceptional Children (Houghton Mifflin Co. U.S.A., 1962) p232. Exceptional or atypical children "...deviate from average children in mental, physical and/or social characteristics to such an extent that they require a modification of school practices or services in order to develop them to their maximum." Ibid., p31. It is very important to remember that there is no line dividing normal from exceptional children, since levels of intelligence, stages of maladjustment or degrees of handicap appear on a continuum. As a consequence it is necessary to provide a wide range of services for exceptional children. In a democracy, however, the education services provided depend to a considerable extent on what the people are willing to pay for, and accordingly, the trend of public opinion towards handicapped children is very important in a study of special education. It has always been the practice in New Zealand to provide special education through the Department of Education rather than the Department of Health, the former Department frequently establishing schools in institutions which are the responsibility of the Department of Health. Some provision has also been made by private organisations such as Mary-lands Residential Special School for Boys run by the Brothers of St John of God. en_NZ
dc.format pdf en_NZ
dc.language en_NZ
dc.language.iso en_NZ
dc.publisher Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
dc.title A review of some aspects of the development in New Zealand of state educational services for handicapped children with general reference to the primary school service between the years 1945 and 1965 en_NZ
dc.type Text en_NZ
vuwschema.type.vuw Awarded Research Masters Thesis en_NZ
thesis.degree.grantor Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington en_NZ
thesis.degree.level Masters en_NZ


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